WordPress 102: Adding Authors to Your Blog and How Does it Work?

Today, I’m going to begin a series called  “WordPress 201” that answers some questions that I had about using WordPress that may not be common knowledge.

This is an intermediate level blog series that is helpful to WordPress users.

We cover topics such as:

  • Guest-blogging
  • Adding users to your blog
  • Where to get free photos
  • Responding to negative comments
  • And more!

Please feel free to leave your questions and comments below (or more privately here). I look forward to talking with you!

So on to today’s topic of adding multiple writers to your blog! Why would you ever want to do add additional users to your blog and how does it work?

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You may know that I run a website called Thoughtful Minds United. TMU is dedicated to bringing folks together to build, connect, and inspire one another.

With this said, it is best suited to have multiple voices or guest bloggers and team members writing on our blog.

I wanted something that allowed my writers to use the TMU platform as if it was their own blog instead of emailing their posts to me all the time and not getting notified whenever a comment arrived.

I wanted something that where guests/team-members could…:

  • Write, edit, tag, categorize, submit/publish their post as if it were their own blog.
  • Receive adequate credit for their post instead of having my name be the linkuntitled
  • Be directly alerted when receiving comments, likes and links to reply to instead of checking back on the post in vain.

What I found was the WordPress “Users” feature that I absolutely love so allow me to introduce you to my little friend. Not only does this feature allow me to do all of the above, it also allows me to customize each users access!

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Now, this feature varies by theme so before you do anything, make sure that your theme allows this (most do from my experience). 

Long story short, the “Users” feature allows your guests, team members, and editors to have different layers of access to your blog.

Here are the basic layers:

Administrator (You): Administrators have access to anything and everything on your blog. They can also change the user of any post. This is the highest level of command in relation to your blog. I recommend that you don’t give this to anyone else because they can literally delete your site if they so choose. 

As an Admin., you can change the role (editor, author, contributor, follower) of any person at any time.

editorEditor: Editors can see, edit, delete, and publish any post on the blog. They also have access to categories, tags, and links. Whenever editors decide to write and publish their own post, they will receive direct notifications whenever someone likes or comments on their post.

However they can not alter your site in any way like adding/deleting users or site themes.

Author: Authors can write, edit, publish and delete their own posts on the typewriterblog. They can also upload pictures and videos.

Whenever authors decide to write and publish their post, they will receive direct notifications whenever someone likes or comments on their post.

They can see the entire blog’s comments, stats and title of posts/scheduled posts but cannot edit them unless it is on their own post.

Contributor: Contributor status is the most “guest blog” friendly off all of these. Contributors can see their own posts but are only allowed to write, edit, and submit their own posts for review. They can not directly publish their own post.

The main difference between an author and a contributor is that contributors can not publish a post on their own. They simply submit it for review and the administrator or editor can edit and publish it from the “Pending” tab in your dashboard.

However, the only pain is that guests cannot add pictures into their own posts. I usually just have them email it to me.

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How the Contributor Side Looks

 

Whenever contributors a post, they will receive direct notifications whenever someone likes or comments on their post. They can see the blog’s comments, stats and title of posts/scheduled posts but cannot edit them.

Follower/Viewer: I feel that this feature is best used if you have a private blog and would like someone else to have access to it without allowing them to your dashboard, stats, etc.

User Roles Guide
User Can’s  Cannot’s
Administrator Everything

-Receives alerts for comments and likes on their posts

Editor See/Change/Delete any post, tags, categories and links.

-Receives alerts for comments and likes on their posts

 -Alter the actual blog/website by theme, menus (I believe are included), adding/deleting users, or altering site themes.
Author   -Write, edit, publish and delete their own posts

-Upload pictures

-Receives alerts for comments and likes on their posts

-See the blog’s comments, stats and title of posts/scheduled posts but cannot edit them unless it is on their own post.

 -Access pages on the blog

-Edit/Delete posts made by other users

Contributor  -Receives alerts for comments and likes on their posts

-See the blog’s comments, stats and title of posts/scheduled posts but cannot edit them.

 -Upload pictures

-Publish their posts

-Access pages on the blog

-Edit/Delete posts made by other users

-Edit blog settings

Next Time: How to Add Additional Writers to Your Blog

 

Next time, we will discuss how to actually complete this task so if you have questions about this feature or blogging in general, leave them here or in the comments!

I look forward to hearing from you. 🙂

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